I think, as a painter, you know you’re work is done when you lose interest…

Yes, it’s complete and I must say that I’ve come to the conclusion that the only part of this painting that the viewer looks at – at least from the comments on Facebook (mostly male)- is this guy’s dick and its size.  Well, that was blunt, wasn’t it?  It prompted me to rework his scrotum, which, of course, made me more than a little self-conscious – where previously I had no reservations.  Geeze.  It is done – but now I think his head is too big!  ha!

Beauty_404

Beauty: 404 Page Not Found, 2017, oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches

Published!

These pieces were chosen for publication in the 2016 edition of Clamor, the annual arts and literary journal for University of Washington, Bothell. In conjunction with the Undergraduate Research Fair at UWB, Clamor is hosting an Art Exhibit on May 13th that will include these works!

Doran_Dana_Melancholy Crow

Melancholy Crow, 2015, oil on canvas, 30 x 40 inches.

Doran_Dana_Quantum Physics

Quantum Physics, 2015, oil on canvas, 18 x 24 inches.

For those that like to read, I was required to submit a brief abstract:

Dana graduated (magna cum laude) from UW Bothell in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in Interdisciplinary Art.  While her artistic endeavors vary between mediums and substrates her focus is primarily in two dimensional pieces of oil on canvas. Impressed by her studies in preserving habitat and climate change, Dana often incorporates these issues into her work by using a blackbird either representing himself, nature as a whole, or an anthropomorphic rendition in substitution for man’s dilemma and his place in nature.  Her work asks the viewer, through the use of visual clues, to consider its message, if only for just a moment, as art is not only documentation of the culture in which we live; it identifies and defines who we are as a society.

Melancholy Crow, 2015, places the blackbird in a pose that would not be found in nature and was intentioned  to draw reference to such classics as Manet’s Olympia.  While the message, man’s encroachment on habitat is strictly subliminal, the classic pose is meant to direct the viewer’s attention to nature and man’s interaction with it.

Quantum Physics, 2015 is the artist’s vision of a headline that read, “Scientists show future events decide what happens in the past.”  Based on the act of observation, the article explained that Australian scientists had used protons in a double slot experiment that proved the statement.  This piece represents the artist’s interpretation of the observation.

I started off my painting session today by ruining the fortune teller in so many ways, I lost count.

Of course, I hadn’t planned on turning this little painting into a saga, but at this point it looks like the more I paint on one element, the more other elements respond negatively.  Argh.  On the good side, I’m liking how its developing overall.  Dealing with two separate light sources, one from the crystal ball and one from this cradled magic orb of light (most likely a proton) is proving to be a bit of a challenge and a lot of imagination.  If only I could get a better picture without all the glare.

fortune teller detail from work in progress, oil on canvas, 18" x 24"

fortune teller detail from work in progress, oil on canvas, 18″ x 24″

Quantum Physics – Future events decide what happens in the past. Whaa?

A couple of months ago, my son introduced me to an article the title of which prompted this work in progress. Scientists show future events decide what happens in the past.  I kid you not.  I read the article, watched the demonstration, watched a YouTube cartoon that tried to put the theory into some sort of layman’s terms (by then I was exhausted) tried to think about it and I sketched out a fortune teller, a smoking crow and a crystal ball.  It’s a work in progress.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/science/experiment-shows-future-events-decide-what-happens-in-the-past/article/434829#ixzz3jgxYlAVZ

work in progress, oil on canvas, 18" x 24"

work in progress, oil on canvas, 18″ x 24″